Film Studies

Head of Subject: Miss C Kavanagh

Film Studies is an extremely enjoyable and worthwhile subject to study, but expect to be constantly challenged and excited by the course. Not only will it change the way you watch film, but more importantly it will challenge you to think in new ways and question or change your perspective on a whole host of issues, for example, representation of race or gender. Studying film allows you to understand important issues and developments within history, society and culture, using film as the medium with which to gain a greater insight into these areas.

Intent

From Hollywood Cinema to Contemporary UK Film, the films on our specification have great critical reputations. They are films of depth and substance which have been purposefully chosen to offer rich and interesting analysis. They represent different time periods and different moments in history showing alternative representations of culture and people.

There is so much more to Film Studies than simply watching films. When watching a film, we might regard it as relaxation or escapism. However, the in-depth study of film involves coming from a very different starting point. As we all gaining an appreciation of film as an art form in terms of its visual storytelling, studying film can enhance your understanding of the world, for example by exploring competing values, attitudes and beliefs. Our course also incorporates a creative production element where you will be able to put what you have learnt into practice by making a short film or writing a screenplay.

The development of deeper critical and creative thinking gained by studying film can enhance many different career paths and is a much sought-after transferable skill both in employment and further study.
The critical skills you develop through studying film will also be of use in GCSE English and modern foreign languages. The deepening historical and cultural perspectives you will develop will inform your work in History, Geography, Sociology and other humanities subjects. If you pursue the screenplay option, writing skills for GCSE English will be enhanced. The visual and design aspects of film production are linked to skills required of art students. You will develop technical skills that can improve your employability in a number of careers.

Key Stage 3

Film Studies is not offered at Key Stage 3

Key Stage 4

GCSE Film Studies


The course is assessed by two external examinations and the production of a NEA unit:

Paper  1: Key Developments in US Film (35%)

Learners will study three US films for this component:

• one comparative study of a pair of mainstream genre films. Includes one film produced between 1930 and 1960 and one film produced between 1961 and 1990

• one independently produced film

All films must be studied in relation to the core study areas set out in detail in the introduction to this section:

1. the key elements of film form (cinematography, mise-en-scène, editing and

sound)

2. the contexts of film (social, cultural, historical, political, technological and institutional), including key aspects of the history of film and film technology


Paper 2: Global Film: Narrative, Representation and Film Style (35%)

Learners will be required to study three films from outside the US for this component:

• one global English language film, from a choice of three, produced outside the US

• one global non-English language film

• one UK film produced since 2010.

As with Component 1, all films must be studied in relation to the core study areas set out in detail in the introduction to this section:

1. the key elements of film form (cinematography, mise-en-scène, editing and

sound)

2. the contexts of film (social, cultural, historical, political, technological and institutional) including key aspects of the history of film and film technology.

In addition, each film chosen will be studied in relation to an additional focus area: narrative (global English language film), representation (global non-English language film) and the aesthetic qualities of film (contemporary UK film).


NEA: Production (30%) Internally assessed, externally moderated by WJEC

The production may take the form of:

· either a filmed extract from a genre film (2 minutes to 2½ minutes) or an extract from a screenplay for a genre film (800 to 1000 words). The screenplay must be accompanied by a shooting script of a key section from the screenplay (approximately 1 minute of screen time, corresponding to approximately one page of screenplay).

· Learners must also provide an evaluative analysis of the production (750 to 850 words), which analyses and evaluates the production in relation to other professionally produced films or screenplays.


EXAM BOARD: EDUQAS

SPECIFICATION: C670QS

For further details, please click the link below:

EDUQAS Film Studies